Search: native plants

Spring unfolding – Focus Point

– Posted in: Garden Photography

It’s wildflower season !  Grab you camera (and tripod), some sturdy shoes, sunblock , a bottle of water, and go study what is unfolding in nature.  The miracles become all the more fantastic by examining the wonder in the details.

A macro lens is essential for studying nature close up.  It will allow close focusing so you can fill your frame with the flower, leaf, or bug; and with a dedicated macro lens, as opposed to a point and shoot with macro capability, you can get some very special photos. [click to continue…]

Bringing Nature Home, or a Spinning a Web?

– Posted in: Miscellaneous

A (British) frog. Courtesy of Deb Evans (the photo not the frog).

I’ve been meaning to read ‘Bringing Nature Home’ by Douglas Tallamy for a while. American readers will probably heard of it – the book which makes the case for growing native plants to support biodiversity, and something of a bible for ‘nativists’. Who, I gather are gaining strength in the US. Whenever I visit I hear complaints from gardeners about “native nazis” – people who dogmatically assert that anyone growing non-natives is somehow an enemy of the environment. It seems a tragedy that an important debate has gotten so bad-tempered.

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Wild Garden Photos

– Posted in: Garden Photography

Autumn pond - Proctorsville, VermontLast month, while our Gardening Gone Wild readers were out shooting for the Fill the Frame theme in our Picture This photo contest, I was on vacation in New England – I was filling my camera frame with fall color in Vermont and the landscapes of poet Mary Oliver in Cape Cod, such as Blackwater Pond:

Blackwater Pond, Cape Cod National Seashore

Funny thing though, while I was ostensibly on holiday from my work as a garden photographer I saw all the wild landscapes as gardens.  God’s gardens to be sure, but I saw them defined by earthly designs. [click to continue…]

Photo Overwhelm

– Posted in: Garden Visits

One of my first first lessons to students who take my garden photography workshops is about “seeing”.  If you don’t stop to think what you are seeing, what it is that excites you about a garden, then you will end up with a photo that will be little more than literally, a snapshot of time.  Let’s take this lesson to Chicago.Lurie garden in Milennium Park, Chicago

When you are in a fabulous garden you can start hyperventilating over beauty, not knowing where to start.  It happens to everyone.  It happened to me in the Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millenium Park.

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Hidden City Garden In Spring

– Posted in: Garden Design, Garden Design

Written by Harry Pierik

In this post, Harry takes us on a stunning tour of his garden in early spring. Learn more about Harry’s garden and design work on his website. To read Harry’s last post on snowdrops, click here and to read his post on his ‘Hidden Garden in The City’, click hereFran Sorin

Spring has returned! During the months of April and March the garden changes almost daily. I have for you a small selection of the garden’s wealth of species.

1eerste deel vd tuin met Rhododendron williamsianum GÇÿGartendirektor GlocknerGÇÖ

When you step through the two doors of my house on the main street, you would enter an entirely different world.
In the first part of the Hidden City Garden you will be able to enjoy, amongst other sights, the holly and lilac topiary.

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