Tag Archives | Royal Horticultural Society

Daffodilophilia

Daffodils at Acorn Bank garden, Cumbria, UK, mostly wild Narcissus pseudonarcissus crossed with some old varieties genetically close to the original wild species. Photo:NK.

Daffodils are somehow the quintessential spring flower. The appearance of their distinctive yellow flowers is a sure sign that winter has either ended or is about to soon. Unlike the tulip, which appears to be dependent on us for its continued re-emergence in the garden, daffodils re-appear faithfully every year; and not just in the garden but in places such as roadsides, churchyards and parks where they have been planted, often decades ago – in some cases over a century ago. These plants are clearly great survivors, as witnessed by the number of flowers which appear in places where they have clearly been accidentally dropped or discarded – the flowers frequently mark where someone emptied the boot of their car of garden waste into a ditch or hedge, little thinking that the event and scene of their crime would be annually and flamboyantly marked for so many years to come.

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Favorite Picks for 2010

When I first started assembling information for this post, I thought I was going to write about The Best Gardening Gifts for 2010. But you know how it is on the web; one thing leads to another.

This is where I landed; with a list that consists of a hodgepodge of projects, products, services, institutions and publications, all that I have seen or used (except for one product) and which I unabashedly recommend. This in no way is meant to be a ‘best of’ list. It is strictly ‘my favorites’. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

Botanical Garden Research: ATLANTA BOTANICAL GARDEN

“Their active captive breeding and research program promotes the conservation of amphibians. “More than one-third of the world’s amphibian species are considered threatened or endangered. Recently, an emerging infectious disease known as the amphibian chytrid fungus has been shown to wipe out massive numbers of amphibians from pristine natural locations in many places around the world. This disease is currently unstoppable in the wild, but treatable in captivity.”

A big thank you goes out to Rhett Turner of Red Sky Productions who brought Atlantic Botanical Garden’s research and conservation efforts to my attention. Rhett’s work as a producer of environmental films is noteworthy. 

amphibian-partnership-1b

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