Tag Archives | photography how-to

Weather, Mood, and Seasons

roses in sunny summer garden

An enduring motif of garden photography is the seasons.  The season, its weather and mood is, often unconsciously, part of every story and in every photo.

When we are within a garden, excited by what we see, it is easy to forget the multi-sensory experiences that create the mood we feel.  Sounds, fragrance, light, the weather, all contribute to the physical experience, to how we absorb the garden and how we feel.

It is a challenge to capture these sensory impressions in a photograph, but by working with the season we can challenge ourselves toward telling better stories. Continue Reading →

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Photo Lesson 2.5 – Leading Lines

path leading to homeWhen trying to find a photo in a garden, a key concept is to look for leading lines.  These are lines you, the photographer, find in a garden that can lead the viewer’s eye into the photo.  These lines can frame your composition and lead to focal points as well, but fundamentally they must start at the bottom, out of the frame, and lead up into the composition. Continue Reading →

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Photos Tell a Story

Feather grass enveloping Phormiums

We finish the chapter on ‘Good Garden Photography’ with part six – telling stories.  I will have a whole chapter, ‘Think Like a Gardener’ that is about finding the themes that can be found in all good gardens, but for now and as you review your year’s images, think about what you are saying with your images.  What was the garden saying to you ?

We started the chapter with good composition, filling your entire frame with just those elements that bring balance to the photo.  We talked about light, and paying homage to what you see in a gardens.  A good photo will do all this and then tell a story, state an opinion, communicate what you really saw. Continue Reading →

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Photos that Provoke and Intrigue

This photo of tall succulents in a narrow bed against a white stucco wall was taken in bright sun to accent the shadows. The intriguing composition is meant to provoke thinking about plant design and sun light.

A good garden photo is more than a nice composition, it should tell a story.  Sometimes the story is no more than communicating good garden technique, for which all our lessons thus far on composition, balance, framing, and light help the photographer concentrate on simply expressing garden appreciation. Continue Reading →

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Seeing the Garden – Framing

Bed of Tulips Framed by Garden Balustrade; Juxtaposition and Forced Perspective

No, it is not tulip time, at least not here in the Northern Hemisphere.  It is time for more garden photography tips and lessons from the e-book I am writing, and teasing you with excerpts right here on Gardening Gone Wild.  Time to begin Chapter Two.

Chapter Two is “Seeing the Garden”, how to use your camera and find a photo that communicates your story.  Much of this chapter will deal with tools and concepts that help you compose your image – somewhat universal artistic ideas that most photography instruction will cover, but here illustrated with gardens.

We  will assume you love gardens, are inspired by something you see, have a story to tell, and need a few tips to put the photo together.  In Chapter Three we will talk about how to find the story to tell when you are overwhelmed by possibilities, how to think like a gardener, and how to find your own voice as a garden photographer, but for now let’s think like a camera.

And once the book is done you might even to choose to read that chapter first.  Heck, my editor may even re-arrange the whole thing.  Right now I need to get to work …. Continue Reading →

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