Tag Archives | photobotanic

Photographing Garden Plants

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Plants are the core of gardens, they are the core of garden photographs.  When we photographers picture plants we need to consider why gardeners grow them in the first place.  What are the core distinctions ?  What is the essence of a garden plant?

A photograph of a plant should be as carefully considered as was the plant when it was placed in the garden. Continue Reading →

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Light – What is it ? Where is it?

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Photographers talk about “The Light” in reverential terms.  It is the life blood of outdoor photography no less than it is the lifeblood of plants for photosynthesis.

Learning how to read the quality of light is the single most important skill in good garden photography. Continue Reading →

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Weather, Mood, and Seasons

roses in sunny summer garden

An enduring motif of garden photography is the seasons.  The season, its weather and mood is, often unconsciously, part of every story and in every photo.

When we are within a garden, excited by what we see, it is easy to forget the multi-sensory experiences that create the mood we feel.  Sounds, fragrance, light, the weather, all contribute to the physical experience, to how we absorb the garden and how we feel.

It is a challenge to capture these sensory impressions in a photograph, but by working with the season we can challenge ourselves toward telling better stories. Continue Reading →

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Tools for flower photography

You have heard of farm to table ?  Here is garden to wall.

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I simply could not resist making a PhotoBotanic illustration of this Iris in my garden.  My studio was all set up from yesterday’s rose shoot and I wanted to practice photo stacking on a more complicated flower than a rose.  Off into the garden . . . an Iris in mind.

More on the photo stacking tool later, a method to get maximum depth of field in one photo by using multiple exposures.  But now, I am distracted by my subject.

I went looking for a big flower and I saw a magnificent stalk.  The day’s work got much longer.  I used another tool.  There is an illustration here that needs to be made. Continue Reading →

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Biomimicry – How Doing It Nature’s Way Will Change The Way We Live

The disappearance of a major natural unit of vegetation from the face of the earth is an event worthy of causing pause and consideration by any nation. Yet so gradually has the prairie been conquered by the breaking plow, the tractor, and the overcrowded herds of man…that scant attention has been given to the significance of this endless grassland or the course of its destruction.  Civilized man is destroying a masterpiece of nature without recording for posterity that which he has destroyed.  John Ernest Weaver, North American Prairie (1954)

How many of you grew up watching ‘Little House on the Prairie’ or reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series of books? The North American prairie is as American as apple pie and is an important part of our heritage.

 Biomimicry - How Doing It Nature's Way Will Change The Way We Live

Photo courtesy of Saxon Holt/Photobotanic

Description of Photo – Fragrant Blue giant hyssop or Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) and Gray-headed Coneflower, Pinnate Prairie Coneflower, (Ratibida pinnata) native perennials flowering in Crow-Hassan Park, prairie reserve.

Continue Reading →

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