Tag Archives | photobotanic

Dogwood – Finding the Photo

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It’s Spring !  At least here in California.  Since many friends across the country are still thawing out, how about we go looking for a photo in my garden?  My pink dogwood tree, Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Chief’, is putting on quite a show.

‘Finding the Photo’ is a classic lesson from my Workshop series.  I ask my students to look at the garden and go beyond the snapshot.  Find that photo that tells a story, that narrows down the viewer’s attention to exactly what you want them to see. Continue Reading →

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A Flower Can Change Your Day

I was all set yesterday morning to begin my post on drought tolerant plants, seeing as how we in California are in the midst of a really dry winter.  Then at breakfast my wife brought me a single Camellia  from the garden, set in a clever stone vase.

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My day changed.  I am so easily distracted. Continue Reading →

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Frosted Camellias

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Frosty flowers on Camellia sasanqua ‘Cleopatra’

Even in California, frost causes problems.  And when it comes in early December it causes big problems.

Almost every gardener I know here in the Northern part of the state pushes the limits of their garden.  It’s California ! – it is our birthright to grow tropicals and tender succulents, plants that are barely hardy in a good year. Continue Reading →

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Rake at Rest

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What is work in the garden ?  For a garden photographer in his own garden, work shifts as the garden speaks.

There are times when the garden cries out for care, and the work is sweaty, grimy, intensely physical.  Then there are times when the garden sings and the work is quiet, aesthetically sensual, even joyful. Continue Reading →

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Telling Stories

Art, sculpture of children playing leapfrog in California meadow gardenIt is easy to get overwhelmed when trying to find a photo in a beautiful garden.  We garden photographers want to capture everything before the moment passes.   We know garden beauty is ephemeral and changes at the drop of a leaf or shifting of the light.

But to make a “good” garden photo, slow down, think about what inspires you.  Tell a story, tell your story the way you see it. Continue Reading →

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