Tag Archives | meadows

Lawn Love Letters

Cover photo location, garden of Susan Harris

With the release of Evelyn Hadden’s new book from Timber Press, “beautiful no-mow yards”, a bunch of bloggers and fellow Lawn Reform Coalition folks decided (with Evelyn’s gentle encouragement) to talk about our love/hate relationships with lawns.  Valentine love letters.

Since yours truly has 60 photos in the book I have a few things to say, or rather show you, what I love about no-mow yards.  The book is not simply about lawn substitutes but all the ways we can re-think our yards and the space too many folks leave for lawn.  How about patios ?  Veggie gardens ?  Ponds ?

And how about meadows ?  Oh boy, can I write love letters to meadow lawns !  I can’t exactly say I wrote the book on meadow gardens, but with nurseryman/designer John Greenlee along as the writer, we co-authored “The American Meadow Garden” in 2009. autographed 

Rather than a negative diatribe of why lawns can be so inappropriate and useless in so many yards, I think I will simply show a bunch of photos, each a love letter itself . Continue Reading →

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Garden Designers Roundtable: Lawn Reform Fun

 

Once again the bloggers at Garden Designers Roundtable bring you a series of networked bogs around a common theme and have asked members of the Lawn Reform Coalition to join forces.  As a member of LRC, I chose to blog on my home turf, here at Gardening Gone Wild.  Many more posts will be found linked at the bottom.

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Retired Lawn

“Retired Lawn” brings a smile every time I drive by.  The front yard of a modest home on a busy street near my house, it is an art installation  worthy of space at Cornerstone Gardens.  Conceptual landscape architects might be more subtle but can do no better at expressing why lawns are not worth the effort:  too much work for too little pleasure.

I seriously  doubt that “Retired Lawn” is intending to make any statement about lawn reform but we can be sure that taking care of that lawn was boring work.  We in the Lawn Reform Coaltion can preach that lawns, as promoted by the lawn and turf industry are water guzzling, chemical dependent, excuses to beat down nature, that  lawns are monocultures that nature sees as sterile wastelands, and that lawn mowers pollute the atmosphere.

But “Retired Lawn” doesn’t care about all this, and besides, RL used a push mower.  Bottom line:  having a lawn was a boring chore. Continue Reading →

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Photo Overwhelm

One of my first first lessons to students who take my garden photography workshops is about “seeing”.  If you don’t stop to think what you are seeing, what it is that excites you about a garden, then you will end up with a photo that will be little more than literally, a snapshot of time.  Let’s take this lesson to Chicago.Lurie garden in Milennium Park, Chicago

When you are in a fabulous garden you can start hyperventilating over beauty, not knowing where to start.  It happens to everyone.  It happened to me in the Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millenium Park.

Continue Reading →

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