Tag Archives | Gardening Gone Wild

Lens Flare

At one point or another all garden photographers will have to deal with lens flare.   Too much strong directional light will cause the glass in the lens to disperse the light – flare, and affect the quality of the image.

lens flare in garden photo

The flare will wash out color and reduce contrast.  It is not always so obvious as in this example, where I was very consciously playing with the sunlight to see how far I could push my lens.  I was previsualizing a glorious sunrise moment and trying every trick I could think of.  More at the end of the post. Continue Reading →

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Hardscape in garden photos

To get a good garden photo, look for hardscape to help define your composition and tell the story, a story about the structure of the garden, how it is put together, what elements, besides the plants, make it work.

In this lesson of the PhotoBotanic Garden Photography Workshop, we continue the assignment theme “Think Like a Gardener” where I ask you to use your own knowledge of gardens and trust your insight to make photos in your own style, communicating in your own voice.  Hardscape is your theme. Continue Reading →

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Photos in the Garden

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Wisteria on my entry gate April 2, 2013

Want a tip on how to take good garden pictures ?  Pick up your camera and go out into a garden.  You can’t get good pictures if you don’t take any pictures.  Put yourself in a position to make something happen.

April 2 was a day to take photos in my own garden.  It was overcast and still – a gift for a garden photographer.  A day to ignore computer deadlines and take pictures.  There have been too many times I regretted missing this sort of opportunity, and spring was calling. Continue Reading →

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Why Pathways Are Such A Compelling Element In The Garden

When I began learning about garden design, I became intrigued with paths – no – make that obsessed. Maybe it dates back to my childhood memories of The Wizard of Oz. Who doesn’t remember when Dorothy reaches a crossroads on her journey to the Wizard and is confused about which way to go ~ and how the talking tree chimes in with his opinion?

Fran Sorin garden

Fran Sorin Garden – top level in backyard

 

Fran Sorin garden- front pathway

Fran Sorin Garden- Front Pathway

The dictionary describes a path as:

~ a way beaten, formed, or trodden by the feet of persons or animals.

~ a narrow walk or way: a path through a garden; a bicycle path.

~ a route, course, or track along which something moves: the path of a hurricane.4.

~ a course of action, conduct, or procedure: the path of righteousness.

Paths are a lot more than that. They can create a sense of mystery. Or a feeling of excitement, anticipation and fear ~ even a journey into the unknown. And when it comes to garden making, without well laid out paths, our gardens are chaotic.

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Photographing Grasses

Toe Toe Grass in the garden of Linda Cochran

Toe Toe Grass in the garden of Linda Cochran

More than any other group of plants, I love to photograph grasses.  They bring light, motion, and texture to gardens.  They range widely in size and color, and mix well into all garden styles, from beds and borders to meadows and in containers.  Because they are so versatile in blending into gardens they can be hard to photograph.

I began to understand how to capture their ornamental effects years ago while working on my Grasses book with Nancy Ondra.  Of all the pictures in the book, the one above in Linda Cochran’s garden, of the tall arching Toe Toe Grass (Cortaderia richardii) was to define how I saw grasses and how I photographed them. Continue Reading →

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