Tag Archives | garden design

Hardscape in garden photos

To get a good garden photo, look for hardscape to help define your composition and tell the story, a story about the structure of the garden, how it is put together, what elements, besides the plants, make it work.

In this lesson of the PhotoBotanic Garden Photography Workshop, we continue the assignment theme “Think Like a Gardener” where I ask you to use your own knowledge of gardens and trust your insight to make photos in your own style, communicating in your own voice.  Hardscape is your theme. Continue Reading →

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Indoor Plant Decor Book and Giveaway

Baumle book
To celebrate the release of their new book Indoor Plant Decor, co-authors Jenny Peterson and Kylee Baumle are having an online celebration via GGW and several other garden blogs. GGW’s door prize is a $25 gift certificate to Logee’s, a mail-order source of rare and unusual plants. The photo above shows the book on my own kitchen windowsill. Continue Reading →

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Get Inside the Garden

Think Like a Gardener – Design and Shape.                                                                               The PhotoBotanic Garden Photography Workshop – Lesson 3.1

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The formal design of Filoli Garden fills the space with precision.

 

Finding your own style as a garden photographer begins with your own understanding of gardens. Think like the gardener within, then get inside the garden to find your photo.

This lesson in The PhotoBotanic Garden Photography Workshop is about Design and Space.  In earlier lessons we talked about design and space as it relates to the composition of a photograph, how to fill the camera frame (space) with a pleasing composition (design).  Here we look at the gardens themselves.  Now we will be looking at themes and assignments for you when you go out with the camera. Continue Reading →

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Photo Lesson 2.5 – Leading Lines

path leading to homeWhen trying to find a photo in a garden, a key concept is to look for leading lines.  These are lines you, the photographer, find in a garden that can lead the viewer’s eye into the photo.  These lines can frame your composition and lead to focal points as well, but fundamentally they must start at the bottom, out of the frame, and lead up into the composition. Continue Reading →

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Garden Designers Roundtable: Lawn Reform Fun

 

Once again the bloggers at Garden Designers Roundtable bring you a series of networked bogs around a common theme and have asked members of the Lawn Reform Coalition to join forces.  As a member of LRC, I chose to blog on my home turf, here at Gardening Gone Wild.  Many more posts will be found linked at the bottom.

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Retired Lawn

“Retired Lawn” brings a smile every time I drive by.  The front yard of a modest home on a busy street near my house, it is an art installation  worthy of space at Cornerstone Gardens.  Conceptual landscape architects might be more subtle but can do no better at expressing why lawns are not worth the effort:  too much work for too little pleasure.

I seriously  doubt that “Retired Lawn” is intending to make any statement about lawn reform but we can be sure that taking care of that lawn was boring work.  We in the Lawn Reform Coaltion can preach that lawns, as promoted by the lawn and turf industry are water guzzling, chemical dependent, excuses to beat down nature, that  lawns are monocultures that nature sees as sterile wastelands, and that lawn mowers pollute the atmosphere.

But “Retired Lawn” doesn’t care about all this, and besides, RL used a push mower.  Bottom line:  having a lawn was a boring chore. Continue Reading →

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