Tag Archives | echeverias

Behind the Scenes with my Succulents 2014 Calendar

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While compiling photos for my Succulents 2014 calendar, I looked back through hundreds of photos I’d taken in 2013. I evaluated them in terms of composition and how they might illustrate a specific month. For January, I think of aloes in bloom. But these photos say more to me than that. When I look at it the photo at lower left, I remember the garden I visited and how lovely it looked that day. It’s in San Diego near the airport, and the designer is Randy Laurie. Continue Reading →

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Of Succulent Wreaths and Cuttings

I’m often asked to recommend sources of succulent cuttings for wreaths, topiaries and other projects. Unfortunately, most online sources sell cuttings for around $1/apiece, which means a wreath—not counting its moss-packed wire donut—may cost $100 to make. But pre-made wreaths available this time of year not only cost much less, they’re also a great source of cuttings.  Garden Life offers wreaths similar to those shown here for $30 plus shipping. Another good mail-order supplier of seasonal wreaths as well as assorted cuttings—including a mix of highly desirable echeveria, sedum and sempervivum rosettes for vertical gardens—is Robin Stockwell’s Succulent Gardens. Continue Reading →

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Are Succulents for the Birds? You Bet!

Bird houses, bird nests and bird cages with succulents…some of the designs I’m seeing are quite fetching. There must be something eggy about succulents, or they have the look of plants that grow on thatched roofs. Like this beautifully designed birdhouse by succulent floral artist Cindy Davison. Her business, The Succulent Perch ships nationwide. Continue Reading →

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Echeverias in Bloom

Echeverias, native to Mexico, have the most amazing blooms.

They remind me of little lanterns or candy corn. Continue Reading →

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Garden Designers Roundtable: The Suggestion of Water


These vignettes suggest water—flowing, tumbling, cascading, splashing or dripping water—yet there is none. Each illustrates the ingenuity of a garden designer in the dry, hot Southwest, where water is scarce. Yet the same concept, of creating the look of water, might apply to any garden. Continue Reading →

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