Tag Archives | Chanticleer Garden

Chanticleer – A Tour With Dan Benarcik – Part 2

In the first video, Dan took us on a tour of the Entryway and Tea Cup Garden.

In this video, before leaving the Tea Cup Garden, Dan shows us one more silver element, rosemary willow – Salix elaeagnous – a small tree or shrub.

Dan cut it back hard this year to re-introduce light, heat, and air circulation into the garden. He likes it because it’s green on the top side with a silver effect on the underneath – which in the wind and breeze creates an interesting two tone effect.

In the video below, Dan is in the Lower Courtyard where he has created an environment that is lush and formal. He shares his thought process in designing this magical piece of art.

Dan also offers up some pearls of wisdom for both the garden and life.

To view the Courtyard and Tea Cup Garden Tour, click here.

To learn more about Chanticleer Garden, click here.

 

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Chanticleer – A Tour With Dan Benarcik

“Garden making is fundamentally not an intellectual enterprise. Most people come to gardens to experience some form of beauty.” Chris Woods

Chanticleer, a 47 acre garden in the suburbs of Philadelphia, was the personal estate of Adolph Rosengarten, Sr. and was passed down to his son, Adolph Jr. and daughter, Emily.

As Adrian Higgins writes in Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden, “Adolph Rosengarten. Jr., loved trees, and the cultural legacy of Chanticleer that he and his sister, and their parents before them, left for us was dependent on trees in what was once open farmland. Without them today, Chanticleer would lose its air of permanence and be seen for what it is: essentially a remarkable but young garden begun in 1990.”

When Rosengarten decided to transform it into a public garden, he hired Chris Woods in 1983, a young English gardener who became the first executive director of Chanticleer in 1990.

Chris “formulated a clear vision of how the garden should develop, assembled a team of highly talented horticulturists, and gave them the freedom to be creative and take risks.”

Taken from Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden – Written by Adrian Higgins. Photos by Rob Cardillo.

The garden is a feast for the eyes -  each of the 13 is filled with intense and innovative plantings – so much so that I find it almost too much to digest in one visit.

When I visited this past June, I was lucky enough to find Dan Benarcik, an incredibly gifted horticulturist, in The Tea Cup Garden. He kindly agreed to take us on a tour of the Courtyard and Tea Cup Gardens – 2 of the 3 gardens where he creates/designs/plants/maintains.

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A Love Affair Gone Awry – Why I Won’t Plant Robinia Pseudocacia In My Garden Again

I’m a pretty intense gardener. So when I love a certain specimen, I tend to use it with great abandon in my garden. Such was the case with Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ and ‘Purple Robe’.

I first came across this specimen on a trip to London in late spring, close to two decades ago. I was taken aback by its delicate, lime colored leaves in contrast with all of the green plant material around the base of its trunk. I made note of it and knew that at some point in the development of my garden that I would find a use for at least one robinia.

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