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Picture This Photo Contest – January 2011

As we kick off the New Year, what better way to start off our first Picture This Photo Contest of 2011 then with David Perry as our judge. As many of you may remember from our August 2009 Picture This, David is a phenomenal, multi-faceted photographer whose work is inspirational.  His website and blog, A Photographer’s Garden Blog are both feasts for the eye and a testament to David’s depth, creativity, and talent as both a garden photographer and writer.

20101027_ps[1]-David Perry-opening photo “Ok, my point-and-shoot-camera-lovin’ friends, you’ve all heard of time in a bottle and a tempest in a teapot, but (unless you’ve been following my blog, A Photographer’s Garden Blog at least November of last year, I’d be willing to bet you’ve never heard of “Macro in a Mason Jar” until now. And that is the theme for this month’s “Picture This” photo contest: Macro in a Mason Jar. Unlike some assignments where the kids with the bigger, fancier cameras have a distinct advantage, I’ve designed this contest just for you, point-and-shooters, but you will need to think small and get close, and you will need to find that nifty little close-up button on your camera, the one that looks like a flower symbol.

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GGW Picture This Contest News

Good news, Picture This fans: you now have extra time to get ready for our next theme: Macro in a Mason Jar, judged by photographer and fellow blogger David Perry. Instead of running the contest in November, we’re going to hold it in January. So, if you haven’t had time to experiment with the technique yet, you have the next two months to try it out. The technique is perfect for this time of year, because you don’t need perfect weather or lots of fresh flowers or foliage: a single, richly colored fall leaf or one perfect late bloom can work just fine. Seeds, fruits, bits of bark, and other natural materials are also fair game. For more details, check out my experiment post or David’s original posts here and here.

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Picture This Contest Winners for October 2010

Early August Annuals

Ready for the results? Here’s what this month’s judge, Craig Cramer of Ellis Hollow, had to say…

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Picture This Reminder for October 2010

Helianthus Music Box cropped A reminder to all of you procrastinators (or for those of you are sitting on the sidelines) that the deadline for this month’s Picture This Photo Contest is only a few days away. The theme is ‘fall on a flatbed scanner’; Nan learned about this technique from Craig Cramer of Ellis Hollow who is our judge for this month.

To enter, post your selected photo on your own blog. Then visit the first of the month post on GGW, written by Nan, announcing the subject for the contest. Leave two links there: one directly to your photo and another to your post. This month’s entry deadline is October 21, 2010 at 11:59pm EST.

For more information about this month’s contest, click on Picture This Photo Contest for October 2010. And don’t forget to check out the gallery of all of this month’s images at GGW Picture This Entries October 2010. To see our past themes, visit GGW Picture This Photo Contest.

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Picture This Photo Contest for October 2010

oct2009_scans_colchicum

This month, we’re going to challenge you with something a bit different: capturing an image without using a camera. I first learned about this technique from a fellow blogger, Craig Cramer of Ellis Hollow, and we’re thrilled that he has agreed to be our judge.

Here’s what Craig has to say: “This month’s theme is Fall on a Flatbed Scanner. If you can scan a photograph, you can do this. It’s easy. It’s fun. It can help you see your garden in new ways. And it doesn’t take any special equipment or exceptional technical skill – just a typical office flatbed scanner, a basket full of subject matter gathered from your garden and a little time to arrange your material and make the scan.

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