About Fran Sorin

Fran’s book, Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening, now considered a classic, was groundbreaking when published as no one had written about gardening in the context of creativity, spirituality, and transformation.

In addition to being a recognized garden expert and deep ecologist, Fran is a broadcaster, journalist, Ordained Interfaith Minister, and Soul Tender.

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Author Archive | Fran Sorin

A Stunning Sustainable Urban Park

In the center of Tel Aviv, overlooking the Mediterranean and abutting the Hilton Hotel, there exists a piece of land made up of well thought out pathways, plant choices and combinations, and vistas that is a perfect template for a simple, easy to maintain and a stunning sustainable urban park.

Stone Walkway in Independence Park

Independence Park – Original Stone Walkway from 1952

 

Urban Sustainable Park

The Independence Park in Tel Aviv

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Planning A Community Garden – With You!

After spending the past 5 years in Tel Aviv, several months ago my instincts told me that it was time to return to my hometown of Philadelphia this spring.

Chanticleer Cutting Garden

Chanticleer Cutting Garden – June 2013

I wasn’t quite sure why but over time it became clear that my inner motivation for going was a deep desire for  planning a community garden.

My dream location for it? West Philly. This section of Philadelphia, where The University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University are located, is filled with a vibrancy, richness, and diversity that I crave.

It is also an area that is in dire need of economic repair. As a matter of fact, it is one of the 5 U.S. Cities that is part of Obama’s Promise Zone Initiative.

For me, it is a ‘soulful’ place where I have always felt at home and been involved with and developed several community programs over the past 25 years.

 

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Peonies In The Hidden City Garden

In this post, our colleague, Dutch landscape designer, Harry Pierik, shares artistic photos and talks about peonies from his personal garden, The Hidden City Garden.

While the vanes of the dove tree, Davidia involucrata, are swaying on the branches in my Hidden City Garden, the first botanical peonies are starting to flourish.

Davidia involucrata

Davidia involucrata

Peonies are perennials of the ranunculus family, with tuberous, fleshy roots and beautiful foliage but it is their flowers that especially speak to the imagination!

For good flowering, the eyes of the rhizomes should not be planted deeper than a few centimeters, in nutritious, humus-rich, well-drained soil in a light spot.

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‘ARTiculture’ – Philadelphia Flower Show 2014

‘ARTiculture’ – Philadelphia Flower Show 2014 – begins today and runs through March 9th.

In the grand hallway, Subaru, a long time sponsor of the show, has created a compelling and whimsical recyclable garden.

Subaru's Recyclable Garden

Subaru’s Recyclable Garden

Notice how the lattices in the walls are made of old bed springs. How cool is that? Continue Reading →

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Snowdrops in The Hidden City Garden

Here is Part 2 of Snowdrops In The Hidden City Garden from Dutch garden designer Harry Pierik.

To read Part 1, click here.

“In the previous post I showed how I prepared the borders of the snowdrops.

Now we’re going to look at how the snowdrops grow in the Hidden City Garden.

Also I’ll show three different yellow cultivars.

In total there are more than one hundred different snowdrops in the Hidden City Garden.

Snowdrops in Hidden City Garden

Snowdrop border in Hidden City Garden

Snowdrop border with in the foreground around the birdbath. Epimedium x peralchicum ‘Frohnleiten’. Three different buxus shrubs form the backbone in this border which appears from the evergreen background, as a peninsula in the grass. In the background the large evergreen leaves of Viburnum x rhytidophylloides Willowwood ‘among others’,  Skimmia japonica, Sasa palmata, Aucuba japonica ‘ Rozannie ‘, and Fatsia japonica.

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