Dry Stream Beds in the Garden

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The desire to get rid of water-thirsty, high-maintenance lawns has led to the rise (no pun intended) of dry creek beds. After all, you have to replace all that garden space with something. Rocks and boulders are fairly inexpensive and create a natural setting. A dry stream bed can add a sense of motion (rushing water) to the garden. Here are a few dry stream beds I admire, and why.

The one above looks like something you’d see in the backcountry. Boulders are semi-buried, and amid them grow annual wildflowers. You get a sense that water once flowed through here but no longer does. It’s believable. Continue Reading →

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A Stunning Sustainable Urban Park

In the center of Tel Aviv, overlooking the Mediterranean and abutting the Hilton Hotel, there exists a piece of land made up of well thought out pathways, plant choices and combinations, and vistas that is a perfect template for a simple, easy to maintain and a stunning sustainable urban park.

Stone Walkway in Independence Park

Independence Park – Original Stone Walkway from 1952

 

Urban Sustainable Park

The Independence Park in Tel Aviv

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Dogwood – Finding the Photo

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It’s Spring !  At least here in California.  Since many friends across the country are still thawing out, how about we go looking for a photo in my garden?  My pink dogwood tree, Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Chief’, is putting on quite a show.

‘Finding the Photo’ is a classic lesson from my Workshop series.  I ask my students to look at the garden and go beyond the snapshot.  Find that photo that tells a story, that narrows down the viewer’s attention to exactly what you want them to see. Continue Reading →

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Fibonacci Spirals

Sunflowers and nautilus shells exhibit a geometric spiral that is found in many cacti and succulents. I thought you might enjoy some examples. Isn’t nature amazing?

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This is Aloe polyphylla, the spiral aloe. Next, some cacti. Continue Reading →

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Planning A Community Garden – With You!

After spending the past 5 years in Tel Aviv, several months ago my instincts told me that it was time to return to my hometown of Philadelphia this spring.

Chanticleer Cutting Garden

Chanticleer Cutting Garden – June 2013

I wasn’t quite sure why but over time it became clear that my inner motivation for going was a deep desire for  planning a community garden.

My dream location for it? West Philly. This section of Philadelphia, where The University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University are located, is filled with a vibrancy, richness, and diversity that I crave.

It is also an area that is in dire need of economic repair. As a matter of fact, it is one of the 5 U.S. Cities that is part of Obama’s Promise Zone Initiative.

For me, it is a ‘soulful’ place where I have always felt at home and been involved with and developed several community programs over the past 25 years.

 

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